Tag: fashionista

Weekly Words: 24th June 2017

Daya by Zendaya Collection

Whilst flicking through a magazine earlier this week, I read an interview with Zendaya Coleman, teen-starlet turned fashion designer. In the interview, she mentioned her collection. Naturally, I had to take a look. I went on the website and seen a few pieces that I thought were cute. Of course, it is nothing entirely new (nothing is anymore) but I liked some things nonetheless. I decided to order a velvet blazer that was on sale for $29.99. I placed my order on Monday evening and by Wednesday afternoon I had it in my apartment – super quick delivery. I was amazed to see that the blazer was actually really high quality. The buttons are heavy and feel more like metal than plastic, the fabric is closer to velvet than velour (what you normally get with “velvet” pieces), and the cut is near perfect. Overall I’m really pleased with my purchase & I think I’ll buy more things in the future. I encourage everyone to check the line out!

Two Separate Designers Claim Gucci Stole Their Logos for Its Cruise 2018 Collection – Fashionista

Gucci’s recent collection has been plagued with controversy. First there was the whole Dapper Dan debacle, in which the brand did admit that they had taken inspiration from the Harlem-based designer, and now there are two new artists claiming that Gucci has copied them, and honestly it is clear to see. The first case was from a New Zealand artist who had designed a snake logo for his t-shirt line. All Gucci did in this case was mirror flip the logo and change the text. The second case was from an Australian graphic designer who designed a tiger logo for a tattoo shop (which he owns the rights for). Gucci copied the logo and placement but changed the animal from a tiger to a lion. I think it is very shady that so many elements in this collection have been copied from other artists, all while Alessandro Michele gets the credit and Gucci gets the profits, because we all know that the t-shirts & totes will retail for hundreds of dollars when they cost less than $50 to print…

Weekly Words: April 22nd 2017

“Calvin Klein Women’s Underwear Campaign Spring 2017”

Calvin Klein has released the women’s campaign for the underwear line, the second set of ads to come out under Raf Simons. Sticking to the brand heritage direction that Simons has taken since starting his new role, this campaign draws back to the 90s style of black and white imagery that Calvin Klein was known for. Sofia Coppola shot an age diverse cast of models for a video, followed by a series of short interviews where they reveal a moment or a fact. For example, in one of Kristen Dunst’s videos she talks about being insecure about her teeth then growing to love them. The videos are all available to watch on Calvin Klein’s YouTube channel, featuring the tagline “Calvin Klein, or nothing at all”: suggestive, with a double meaning, and similar to the infamous & paraphrased nothing between me and my Calvins said by Brooke Shields in the 80s.

Balenciaga’s $2,145 bag is just like Ikea’s 99 cent tote” – CNN

For sale at Barneys

In another classic case of “is this a joke or not?”, Balenciaga has retailed a bag costing over 2k that looks exactly like the industrial-style totes you can buy at Ikea for a dollar but this time made of leather. The CNN article, along with countless others, has brought the bag to international attention. I feel like the writer of the article may not know that Demna Gvasalia, the Creative Director of Balenciaga, also designs for Vetements as in the article they state: “In the age of high-fashion brands recreating cheap favorites — Vetements’ recreations of Hanes T-shirts for $740, for example — Balenciaga may just be jumping on the bandwagon.”

I personally think that selling this bag for the price they are is ridiculous, but I also understand that it is just a publicity stunt intended to generate buzz. Perhaps a few influencers will be spotted wearing it on Instagram but apart from that I think the aim is more so to bring attention to the Balenciaga brand. Also, Demna Gvasalia is someone who has fun with fashion and likes to poke fun at the industry in a way. This bag could be an inside joke, just like the DHL t-shirt was at Vetements (made because they used DHL messengers so frequently when they were shipping orders).

“Inside #RevolveFestival, An Influencer-Filled Weekend That Dominated the Coachella Party Scene” – Fashionista

I spoke a lot about Coachella last week in preparation for the first weekend of the festival and I’ve honestly found it fascinating to read the coverage of the event afterwards. It seemed that Coachella was very much an influencer focused event this year with little attention on the music and plenty of shine on the outfits and parties. In fact, I probably seen more Instagrams from #HotelRevolve at #RevolveFestival than I did from people actually at Coachella. This article from Fashionista takes us inside the various events held by Revolve over the festival weekend and details the guests, the perks, and the happenings inside the parties. It seems that celebrities got lots of free stuff (of course) and extra special performances from musicians. The main point of these types of events, held by various brands during Coachella in venues outside of the festival grounds, is to generate publicity and, in turn, sales. However, the actual link between these events and sales is not yet proven with concrete evidence but judging by how much money brands sink into hosting these events plus the grand scale of them, I’m guessing it pays off. Read the article linked for further details on how the sponsored events work and also if you have a spare hour listen to this podcast from Fashionista which discusses Coachella and the whole sponsored festival dynamic in greater detail.

Fashionista Article: Should Fashion Week Become A Consumer-Facing Event?

The CFDA are considering a radical new show schedule for New York Fashion Week with lots of ideas being thrown around. The general idea is, given how interested consumers now are in this digital age, that the wait time between garments being shown on the runway to them actually hitting the stores is too long. The most hyped items are often forgotten about by the time the next fashion week comes around because the famous bloggers and celebrities somehow managed to get their hands on them already and by the time they hit the stores it is too late. A wholly revised schedule has been proposed, one that should benefit the consumers mainly but also the retailers. It would mean that fast fashion stores would have less time to turn out a copy, meaning people would either have to wait until it trickled down or just buy full-price. I think it would have huge repercussions on the fashion industry as we know it.

A Spring 2016 Alexander Wang look, one of New York's most prominent designers
A Spring 2016 Alexander Wang look, one of New York’s most prominent designers

I actually think the reforms being discussed sound very good. The idea of showing clothes for the upcoming season when the season is about to start makes a lot of sense. This Fashionista article does a good job of weighing up the pros and the cons of the proposal. I firmly believe it is a positive idea for the actual fashion industry in general; what do you think?

 

The Rise of Designers As Aggregators – Fashionista Article

I want to bring your attention to this brilliant article on Fashionista, entitled the same as my title, about the increasing similarities between collections at fashion week. I think after seeing many of the shows at New York Fashion Week, I had an overwhelming feeling of “I’ve seen this before” and that is what the writer has picked up on.

I get it. Fashion is never entirely new. Everything has been done before. However, it is getting a little bit dull when designers are churning out collections that combine too many elements of another brand’s collection from just a season or two before. Now there are many undeniable similarities between collections and that happens every season. In fact, without that coincidence there would be no such thing as trends. There are some designers who are just so influential that there are elements of their work everywhere (take Phoebe Philo who is name checked in the article as an example).

I think the article is just a good read and is so relevant, especially after fashion week. It will also be interesting to see if the whole sixties/seventies trend continues in Milan and Paris like they have with many designers in New York, and also a little bit in London (think the suede skirt suit at Topshop Unique).