Tag: good american

Weekly Words: 14th September 2017

“Made Gold Founder Confronts Good American’s Emma Grede at La Conference Following Copying Claims” – Fashionista

Kylie Jenner in Made Gold – October 2016

Khloe Kardashian’s denim line “Good American” had the most successful launch in history. Since then, the brand has gone from strength to strength, introducing new product lines and receiving distribution in department stores across America. However, the feedback for the brand has not always been positive. The brand has been marred by claims of copying smaller designers, asking for samples of their products then replicating it almost to the stitch and then selling it on their site, reaping all of the products and leaving the smaller, indie designers out of pocket and out of luck. Fortunately, we are in the age of social media which means an unknown can get attention the same way that a celebrity does. Using her Instagram account, Destiney Bleu managed to draw attention to the fact that Good American stole her designs for a line of bejewelled bodysuits. Bleu was later sent a cease-and-desist letter from Good American’s lawyers and the case seems to have stalled since. Another brand which claimed Good American copied their designs is Made Gold, a smaller, indie denim line worn by the likes of Bella Hadid and even Kylie Jenner. A famous style of theirs with laces up the side of the legs was worn by the aforementioned stars before Good American apparently copied it. Instead of using social media, the founder of Made Gold chose to confront the situation directly, using a Q&A section at the Fashion Tech Forum in LA to voice her concerns. Emma Grede, Khloe Kardashian’s founding partner of Good American, instead dodged the question and the panel session ended. Unsurprisingly so, Good American chose to ignore the allegations and act like nothing happened. I think this is a poor strategy. We all know that fashion is an industry that thrives off of copycats: high-end designers copy each other, contemporary designers copy the high-end, and fast-fashion copies them all. By ignoring this process, Grede and Good American made themselves look, once again, untrustworthy and any designers who send their samples to Khloe Kardashian again risks the same copy-cat treatment. Spout off a false line about being influenced by “girls on the street, girls on social media”, whatever. Just don’t ignore it all together.

“FarFetch Is Selling 500 Gianni-era Vintage Versace Pieces” – Fashionista

Following Donatella Versace’s triumphant fashion week tribute to her late brother, Gianni Versace, which was influenced by vintage styles that he designed ranging throughout the 1980s into the early 90s, Versace-mania is back in full-flow. The brand is at the buzziest it has been in years. Smartly so, FarFetch have teamed up with William Vintage, a London-based boutique, to offer a range of archival Versace pieces for sale on their site. Many designs are almost identical to the ones that walked down the runway a couple of weeks ago, but they have the edge given that they are the real, original pieces. FarFetch’s business model is interesting. Their concept is that, instead of having their own inventory and placing a seasonal buy like other e-commerce sites do, they partner with small boutiques around the world, facilitating the distribution of the products and allowing the boutiques to reach a global market that they may not be exposed to if they tried to do it alone. FarFetch, of course, keeps a cut of the profits. I love the company and the whole idea of it, and I truly believe it is one of the most innovative companies in fashion. As for the Versace collection, there are some pretty to-die-for pieces in there – matching skirt suits, leopard printed jackets and leggings, belts and brooches, and baroque prints. The prices are very steep but what you are paying for is a piece of fashion history. I hope one day to build up my own archive of vintage designer pieces, as collectors items, not for wearing. I urge you to check out the edit – here on FarFetch.

 

A $42,000 Gucci fur coat available at FarFetch 
Gucci is the latest brand to bow to pressure and eliminate the fur styles from its product offerings, choosing to auction off the fur inventory, starting early next year. The alternative option which they will likely use is faux-fur, joining the likes of Stella McCartney (also owned by Kering, Gucci’s parent company) and Giorgio Armani. The main reason they cited for the decision to stop using fur was sustainability. I call bullshit. I think they are just trying to get a good reputation in an increasingly socially-conscious, animal-friendly, harm-nobody society that we currently live in. Caring about these things is cool and Gucci likely wants to capitalize on this mindset. Fur, a natural animal based material, is biodegradable. It causes no harm to the planet. Faux-fur, on the other hand, laden with chemical treatments and synthetic materials has been proven to cause environmental damage. We are in a time where the leader of the free world is a climate change denier, despite there being a mountain of evidence (and an increasing number of natural disasters devastating the world) to prove it to be true. In that case, shouldn’t we be looking into more natural products and materials that aren’t harmful? If you don’t want to support the fur trade, you can buy vintage styles. And if you’re wholly opposed to fur, you can just not buy it. Overall, I am just slightly disappointed in Gucci. Whatever.
FarFetch coat – $42,000

The KarJen Fashion Empire

I hate to admit it but I’ve fallen into the Kardashian’s trap. It started off innocently, watching their show whilst eating breakfast in the morning if I had nowhere to rush off to and now I’ve found myself invested in their external businesses, purely because of what I’ve seen on the show.

I’ve been vocal in the past about my distaste for the Kardashian/Jenners in the fashion industry and I still stand by that partially. I don’t think Kendall should be booking all of the modelling jobs she is but you also can’t knock her for getting a paycheck and taking advantage of the awesome opportunities that come her way. You can’t knock Kim for sitting front row at fashion shows or wearing vintage Galliano or Vivienne Westwood (as she has been favoring recently). If she gets invited to the shows and has the resources to wear these clothes, of course she would. And finally, I can’t knock Kanye for his Adidas line because that truly is his passion and you can see that clearly.

The things that I refused to give the Kardashians a pass for in the past were their clothing lines. I’m not a huge fan of the celebrity designer trend and the fact that just because they have a well known name they can easily find financial backers and launch a line like its nothing. However, since watching the show and learning a little bit more about the brands coming out of the KarJen klan currently, I’ve become slightly more intrigued.

First off, there is Kendall + Kylie, a contemporary line sold in stores like Bloomingdale’s, Lord & Taylor and Nordstrom. They sell clothing, shoes, and accessories. It was a full-on brand from its very first season. On an episode that I just watched (a late repeat), Kendall and Kylie are at their showroom in New York with Nicole Phelps from Vogue Runway. Phelps is there to review the collection. When the pair are taking her around the showroom, they pick up some of their favorite pieces and describe them as cool and simple and can’t say much more than that. They can’t describe their customer besides the fact that she used to be a California girl but is now more than that. Phelps doesn’t seem too impressed. I know that the show is scripted to some extent but I do feel like Kendall and Kylie’s lack of descriptive adjectives to really explain to Phelps what their collection meant and stood for was genuine. They aren’t really involved in the creation of the line besides giving final approval and being the face of the brand and that is evident. Their role aside, the merchandise is actually cute and if you were to see it on the floor in a Nordstrom store you would probably buy it. The only downside to the brand is the price-point. They wanted to differentiate the line from others they have done in the past, like the PacSun collection or the Topshop collaboration. This was meant to be more high-end and the prices reflect that, although I don’t think there is that much of an evolution in the styles shown. In the end, Nicole Phelps wrote a very fair review for Vogue. 

Screenshot of the Kendall + Kylie Instagram account which boasts 4.4m followers

The next KarJen brand that I was interested in is the Kids Supply, Kim and Kanye’s childrenswear capsule collection. Because of the size, I instantly find childrenswear adorable. It helps that North West is the best dressed child in the world (besides the extremely age-inappropriate lace and mesh shirts that they used to dress her in) so I feel like the couple know how to dress kids. The collection featured an embroidered bomber with “Calabasas” motifs (which was reversible too), mini slip dresses, caps with “kids” embroidered across the front, and t-shirts. There was a small product selection but it sold out within the weekend. Some items are on pre-order. I liked this line and I’m honestly not mad at the couple for trying to enter the childrenswear market. The pricing was high but you also cannot criticize someone for that. It’s like when people laugh at Gwyneth Paltrow and her exorbitantly priced gift guides on Goop. It’s not for everybody and that’s ok. It doesn’t mean that it is an invalid market to target just because you don’t fit into their income demographic.

Screenshot of the Kids Supply e-store

Finally, the brand which I was actually the most impressed with and would love to see in person is Khloe’s denim line. Launched in October last year and entitled Good American, the line features jeans, skirts, and jackets in sizes 00 – 24. It is meant to cater to every body shape and fit and flatter all. I think that’s a bold statement to make yet everybody who I’ve seen wearing the jeans looks amazing. Khloe and her partner have done a good job on the fits, with the Good Cuts with the released hem being my personal favorite style. The premium denim market is pretty full, with brands like Paige, Frame, and J Brand being longstanding stars. However, Khloe’s line managed to disrupt the norm and proved to be Nordstrom’s second biggest launch ever. The line itself was the biggest denim launch of all time. It made $1 million on its first day. Pretty impressive for a reality tv star, huh. I think that figure alone just shows the bankability of the KarJen family. It makes sense that they want to capitalize on the fashion industry while they can. Their looks are some of the most influential.

Kylie in Good American

I have softened on the KarJen family. I used to think of them as representing the decline in culture (and I guess that argument still could be made) and everything that was wrong with modern society, but now I can appreciate their hustle. This family is damn good at business and knows how to build brands. It will be interesting to see how long each of their brands continue for. In the past, there has been Kardashian Kollection (a collaboration between Kourtney, Kim and Khloe) which was sold at Sears. This line was unsuccessful. They have the DASH boutiques which are more of a tourist destination than a fashion spot. Then Kendall and Kylie have their previous collections and brands. As with everything, the brands will live as long as they continue to be popular. Judging by social media and sales figures, they’ll be here to stay for a while.