Tag: kylie jenner

Reselling Gifts

Famous people get free shit. It has been that way for a long time. Nowadays, it has evolved from merely gifting (e.g. swag bags at events) to paying them to promote the product. The notion of fame has expanded too. Anyone with internet access can be famous now, which means that regular people with followers online are being paid large sums of money to talk about things. It seems that we all have a price and, in fact, are all just walking billboards. People are now more aware of this than before and take what they see and read online with a pinch of salt, so perhaps paid promotions will be less effective for brands than before (although I did read that FashionNova was one of the top Google searches of the year and they are known for paying influencers and celebrities to promote the brand).

The lesser discussed side of things is what happens to pieces that people are gifted. As an influencer, you receive PR packages from brands on a daily basis. I used to watch a Beauty YouTuber who would receive an entire collection from a brand and only actually like say 2 out of 30 shades of lipstick sent. The rest of the collection would either be hoarded or donated to women’s shelters. With beauty products, the resale market is small. Only the most collectible items can be sold, and only if they are unopened for sanitary reasons. If a YouTuber opens a product to swatch it, the value is gone. Fashion, on the other hand, is a booming resale market and shows no sign of slowing down.

Influencers are donated pieces, or buy them at a super steep discount (80-90% off), and sell them after they’ve worn them once or twice. After all, once they’ve posted it on their Instagram they have to get rid of it (or not rewear it publicly…). The same thing happens at fashion magazines: editors are gifted pieces for promotional consideration, whether they choose to write about them or not is up to them, and they can do whatever they want with the pieces afterwards. The sheer volume of stuff is why people sell it on and make some money in the process. I have sold items on Depop in the past. The app tends to focus on items with a lower price point, mainly vintage pieces that you could find in a thrift store (often what Depop sellers do, hauling items from Goodwill and comparable stores and selling them for a small profit) or gently worn fast-fashion pieces. You don’t tend to see too many brands on there. The sites that are used for selling designer pieces are TheRealReal, Tradesy, Vestiaire Collective, and sometimes eBay.

The ethics of selling things that you didn’t actually pay for are a little bit murky. On one hand, it is how many young editors in fashion sustain their lifestyles. On the other, you are profiting 100% off of things you did not purchase and are likely not declaring that income on your tax forms so it is pretty shady. Fashion editors tend to be on a very low salary yet seem to all be wearing designer pieces and living in New York City. Something’s gotta give.

Racked did a wonderful project, called The Swag Project, where they kept all of the pieces that the editors were given over a 6 month period and totaled its value, plus added a few articles digging deeper into the ethics behind it all. In the 6 months, the site received close to $100k worth of items for free yet only wrote about 3% of the products sent to them. The best article to come out of this project is an article entitled “The Secret Swag Resale Economy” which delves into the rife reselling that goes on at magazines. For example, a Conde Nast staffer initially felt guilty after selling a laser hair removal package that she was gifted and keeping the proceeds then quickly realized that that is just how things operate there. Much of the fashion industry runs on a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, in all facets of the industry. I follow a YouTuber who was involved in a mini-scandal when a follower on Depop called her out for reselling an item gifted to her that was an exclusive piece not originally for sale. This happens all the time so it was interesting to see her response which was, of course, very defensive. Also interesting was the fact that fashion editors do this all the time and get no response. Perhaps it is just because it is less known or less public.

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With the rise of social media, fashion editors have fast become celebrities with followings in their own right. It used to be that only the top tier of magazine editors were known, but now even a fashion assistant at a publication can garner a following in the tens of thousands. Of course, once you hit around 5000 followers on Instagram, the paid promotions come-a-knocking. The FTC has cracked down on paid promotions online though, releasing guidelines that say you must clearly state at the beginning of the caption that it is an ad. They have also been investigating people and issuing fines for influencers and celebrities who do not abide by the guidelines. Paid promotions in the fashion industry, however, are not as clear as #ad. Editors get free clothes, discounts, attend parties, get sent on trips, and have dinners. They often attend the same events as influencers who are vocal about their payment / partnership, but don’t post about them in the same way: Fashionista did a good post about the “tricky ethical territory” that editors verge into as a result of this. The discussion on this topic is promising because it means that consumer awareness is high. I don’t have a problem with people attending the events or reselling their free stuff, as long as people know that it is happening. Instagram tends to portray a false reality and people are often fooled into seeing the world in a way that simply does not exist. I would like to see that change and people be a lot more transparent about things.

Recommended reading:

The Secret Swag Resale Economy” – Racked

Arguably the most interesting article in The Swag Project, this article delves deep into the practice of gifting at magazines and the ethical guidelines in which staff are told to follow.

“We Received $95,000 Worth of Free Stuff in 6 Months” – Racked

The first article in The Swag Project with a lot of information on what was received and what happened to it all. Amazing infographics!

“As Editors Transition to Influencers, They Enter Tricky Ethical Territory” – Fashionista

Further delves into the discussion started by Racked and mentions some key items that were suspected to be gifted to editors and influencers alike. 

Weekly Words: 22nd July 2017

“Why Does Every Model Look Like Kylie Jenner Now?” – Racked

GQ @gqmexico @gq_germany @mrmikerosenthal

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Racked made a good point that upon perusing various e-commerce sites and teen-focused retailers, a lot of the models looked like or were styled like Kylie Jenner. This doesn’t come as a surprise to me as this is something that I have noticed when looking on these stores. Conveniently so, some of the brands name-checked in the article are stores that Jenner herself has promoted on her Instagram at one point or another – FashionNova and the infamous badly photoshopped photo of her butt in jeans, PrettyLittleThing and the orange dress that kept selling out after she wore it to one of their parties, House of CB, a brand worn by all of the sisters. Other stores like Missguided often curate an edit around “Kylie Jenner” style pieces, either inspired by what she has already worn or by what they think she would wear. It makes a lot of sense that all of these retailers would do this given that their customer base tends to be interested in all things Kardashian. They are the same age as the Jenners (or a little bit younger), will dutifully copy and buy anything that they are instructed to, and manipulate their own appearance to look like the lipstick mogul. It’s only common sense that the brands would then use models who look like Kylie to sell their products because that way their customers can imagine theirselves looking like that to. It is a fairly easy look to achieve with the right make-up products (and perhaps a trip to the doctor’s office for the most dedicated few). Say what you want about Kylie Jenner (and the rest of her family for that matter), but one thing that is undeniable is their influence on teenage girls and on teenage culture in general.

Elle USA August 2017 cover

This cover screamed vintage Madonna at me as soon as I picked it out of my mailbox. Everything looks very Italian and the hair style and make-up made me think of Madonna circa the 1991 shoots with Steven Meisel. Couple that with the Dolce & Gabbana corseted bustier and it’s a material girl in front of our eyes. Emilia Clarke, best known as the platinum blonde from Game of Thrones, makes sense as a cover star given that the latest series of the show premiered last weekend. The Dolce & Gabbana outfit is also apt as she signed on as the face of their perfume earlier this year, with her debut campaign for the brand set to launch in September. The cover was shot by Alexi Lubomirski and styled by David Vandewal.

Zara FW17 campaign is shot by Steven Meisel, styled by Karl Templer, creative direction by Fabien Baron

The KarJen Fashion Empire

I hate to admit it but I’ve fallen into the Kardashian’s trap. It started off innocently, watching their show whilst eating breakfast in the morning if I had nowhere to rush off to and now I’ve found myself invested in their external businesses, purely because of what I’ve seen on the show.

I’ve been vocal in the past about my distaste for the Kardashian/Jenners in the fashion industry and I still stand by that partially. I don’t think Kendall should be booking all of the modelling jobs she is but you also can’t knock her for getting a paycheck and taking advantage of the awesome opportunities that come her way. You can’t knock Kim for sitting front row at fashion shows or wearing vintage Galliano or Vivienne Westwood (as she has been favoring recently). If she gets invited to the shows and has the resources to wear these clothes, of course she would. And finally, I can’t knock Kanye for his Adidas line because that truly is his passion and you can see that clearly.

The things that I refused to give the Kardashians a pass for in the past were their clothing lines. I’m not a huge fan of the celebrity designer trend and the fact that just because they have a well known name they can easily find financial backers and launch a line like its nothing. However, since watching the show and learning a little bit more about the brands coming out of the KarJen klan currently, I’ve become slightly more intrigued.

First off, there is Kendall + Kylie, a contemporary line sold in stores like Bloomingdale’s, Lord & Taylor and Nordstrom. They sell clothing, shoes, and accessories. It was a full-on brand from its very first season. On an episode that I just watched (a late repeat), Kendall and Kylie are at their showroom in New York with Nicole Phelps from Vogue Runway. Phelps is there to review the collection. When the pair are taking her around the showroom, they pick up some of their favorite pieces and describe them as cool and simple and can’t say much more than that. They can’t describe their customer besides the fact that she used to be a California girl but is now more than that. Phelps doesn’t seem too impressed. I know that the show is scripted to some extent but I do feel like Kendall and Kylie’s lack of descriptive adjectives to really explain to Phelps what their collection meant and stood for was genuine. They aren’t really involved in the creation of the line besides giving final approval and being the face of the brand and that is evident. Their role aside, the merchandise is actually cute and if you were to see it on the floor in a Nordstrom store you would probably buy it. The only downside to the brand is the price-point. They wanted to differentiate the line from others they have done in the past, like the PacSun collection or the Topshop collaboration. This was meant to be more high-end and the prices reflect that, although I don’t think there is that much of an evolution in the styles shown. In the end, Nicole Phelps wrote a very fair review for Vogue. 

Screenshot of the Kendall + Kylie Instagram account which boasts 4.4m followers

The next KarJen brand that I was interested in is the Kids Supply, Kim and Kanye’s childrenswear capsule collection. Because of the size, I instantly find childrenswear adorable. It helps that North West is the best dressed child in the world (besides the extremely age-inappropriate lace and mesh shirts that they used to dress her in) so I feel like the couple know how to dress kids. The collection featured an embroidered bomber with “Calabasas” motifs (which was reversible too), mini slip dresses, caps with “kids” embroidered across the front, and t-shirts. There was a small product selection but it sold out within the weekend. Some items are on pre-order. I liked this line and I’m honestly not mad at the couple for trying to enter the childrenswear market. The pricing was high but you also cannot criticize someone for that. It’s like when people laugh at Gwyneth Paltrow and her exorbitantly priced gift guides on Goop. It’s not for everybody and that’s ok. It doesn’t mean that it is an invalid market to target just because you don’t fit into their income demographic.

Screenshot of the Kids Supply e-store

Finally, the brand which I was actually the most impressed with and would love to see in person is Khloe’s denim line. Launched in October last year and entitled Good American, the line features jeans, skirts, and jackets in sizes 00 – 24. It is meant to cater to every body shape and fit and flatter all. I think that’s a bold statement to make yet everybody who I’ve seen wearing the jeans looks amazing. Khloe and her partner have done a good job on the fits, with the Good Cuts with the released hem being my personal favorite style. The premium denim market is pretty full, with brands like Paige, Frame, and J Brand being longstanding stars. However, Khloe’s line managed to disrupt the norm and proved to be Nordstrom’s second biggest launch ever. The line itself was the biggest denim launch of all time. It made $1 million on its first day. Pretty impressive for a reality tv star, huh. I think that figure alone just shows the bankability of the KarJen family. It makes sense that they want to capitalize on the fashion industry while they can. Their looks are some of the most influential.

Kylie in Good American

I have softened on the KarJen family. I used to think of them as representing the decline in culture (and I guess that argument still could be made) and everything that was wrong with modern society, but now I can appreciate their hustle. This family is damn good at business and knows how to build brands. It will be interesting to see how long each of their brands continue for. In the past, there has been Kardashian Kollection (a collaboration between Kourtney, Kim and Khloe) which was sold at Sears. This line was unsuccessful. They have the DASH boutiques which are more of a tourist destination than a fashion spot. Then Kendall and Kylie have their previous collections and brands. As with everything, the brands will live as long as they continue to be popular. Judging by social media and sales figures, they’ll be here to stay for a while.

How do you control the use of your image?

Following Kendall & Kylie Jenner’s latest controversial misstep – screen printing their faces on “vintage” t-shirts from bands and rappers then selling them for $125 – I spent some time thinking about how artists can protect their legacy once they are gone, or even when they are still here.

The Jenner sisters’ collection of t-shirts featured artists like Tupac Shakur & Biggie Smalls, both deceased, and bands like Pink Floyd. Biggie Smalls’ mother, Voletta Wallace spoke out against the t-shirt in an Instagram post, calling it “exploitation” and “disrespectful”, and mentioned the key point that the sisters nor their teams reached out to her or anybody connected to Biggie’s estate to check if it was actually ok for them to use his image. Sharon Osbourne, wife of Ozzy (who was featured on one of the t-shirts), said that the girls hadn’t “earned the right” to put their faces with icons. The t-shirts were pulled from their website the day of the launch and Kendall & Kylie both issued an apology online.

I think it was pretty clear for everyone to see that the Jenners were in the wrong in this situation. It was a blatant money-making scheme which they hadn’t any business being involved in. However, someone approved it and for some reason it was released to the public. I think after receiving such harsh criticism from so many prominent figures will resonate with them. However, they are not the only people to ever use someone’s image without their permission. In fact, tour merchandise especially is often replicated.

Forever 21 and Kanye West had issues in 2016 when they copied the Pablo merch almost exactly. Justin Bieber teamed up with H&M to make a capsule collection of “Purpose” merch. It was a strange but apt collaboration given that H&M continually sell unofficial band merchandise, from Guns N’ Roses and Metallica. Then I also wonder how Metallica felt when Kanye West reused their famous logo and changed it into the Yeezus logo, splattering it on t-shirts, hats, and hoodies and selling it in droves. Yeezus merch was some of the most popular merch that I can remember in recent history so I can only assume that the profits were crazy high. Did Metallica get a cut?

Voletta Wallace made the point that nobody connected to the estate, meaning the estate of her deceased son Christopher Wallace, were contacted before Kendall & Kylie’s t-shirts were made and I then thought about how many t-shirts and memorabilia type items are made with people like Marilyn Monroe & Audrey Hepburn’s faces on it. Does their estate get a cut of all of these product’s profits? Or is it a lost cause?

The Rubens styles from the LV x Jeff Koons collaboration

Finally, I was reminded of the Louis Vuitton x Jeff Koons collaboration. Koons used famous masterpieces like the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and printed them on bags. Louis Vuitton are now selling the capsule collection. A bag from there will set you back $3200 for a Neverfull tote. How does that situation work out? If they are profiting from the work from a long deceased artist, in this case literally hundreds of years deceased, how does it work out in terms of copyright/ownership? I would be curious to find out more. Off-White also makes Caravaggio printed t-shirts for $293.

I guess my main question that I am posing with this post is how do people ensure that the profits from products are going to the right people? If someone’s likeness is used without their knowledge/consent, what is their legal rights/claims on the product’s profits? This is a subject that I’m going to explore in more depth personally over the next few weeks, doing some research. If I find out anything exciting, I will add it to this post as an update!

Thoughts on Kylie Jenner for Puma

The activewear market is growing rapidly and on top of that activewear is being worn outside of the gym, in daily life. Sneaker culture is now mainstream. Entire brands form and grow based on these concepts. Think of V-Files hoodies, Common Projects sneakers, and the whole rebirth of forgotten sportswear brands of the nineties like Ellesse (now sold at Topshop) and Fila. Luxury brands like Balenciaga and Chanel both sell sneakers. Calvin Klein bras and briefs peek out from underneath, what seems like, 80% of teenage girls clothes. Yoga pants and running tights are worn as regular pants and sports bras are worn as crop tops. Basically, this whole segment of the market is booming and brands want to cash in on that.

In my opinion, Puma has always been known primarily for its suede sneakers. Apart from that it isn’t a brand I’ve ever thought about. It’s not quite as big as the two big hitters, Nike and Adidas, and I feel that it sometimes gets left behind. How funny is it that the founders of Adidas and Puma were brothers? Puma’s revenue is around $9bn less than Adidas annually. The partnership with Rihanna was designed to bring it back into the international psyche. It is now fashionable. In order to cash in on all things fashionable and now, they got a Kardashian/Jenner involved. Of course.

I don’t like Kylie Jenner for Puma. It is weird. For one, I think Khloe should’ve got the activewear endorsement job since she’s the one who is all about working out. Secondly, the campaign images released seem so out-of-touch, culturally appropriative, and just awkward. Thirdly, I’d much prefer Rihanna.

I understand that Rihanna has a different kind of partnership with the brand in the form of Fenty Puma, a range of clothes and shoes that even got its own runway show, whilst she is serving as the creative director of womenswear for Puma, so she will likely promote that line. The fur slides have sold out multiple times. However, the Kylie Jenner/Puma connection is a little bit unclear. When it was announced there was great controversy due to Kanye West denouncing claims that Kylie had her own deal with Puma on account of his, extremely successful, partnership with Adidas. I’m guessing this one was worked out behind closed doors because lo and behold, here we have the images of Kylie, styled by Monica Rose, splattered all across social media.

I just find them awkward. They feel contrived. Kylie would never be in a scenario like she is placed in for the ads so it feels so unnatural. In one image, she stands with one foot up on the subway seat, surrounded by graffiti, wearing glasses reminiscent to Cazals (the glasses worn famously by New York hip-hop artists in the 80s like Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC). She wears a gold knuckleduster. In another she stands at a pay phone holding pitbulls on a chain. Who even uses pay phones nowadays? Her tan is so deep at first glance I thought she was Latina (probably the look they were going for, in all honesty). It is appropriation of hip-hop culture by a rich white girl, 100%. But that’s Kylie’s whole look. Check her Instagram for some cornrows and Yeezy merch posted mere hours after the Puma ads were released.

 

The only way a Kylie Jenner x Puma collab would’ve worked would be if they photographed her by the pool in Calabasas or, on the beach in Malibu, or in a selfie style campaign. Instead of putting her in fake situations, let her document her daily life and how she incorporates streetwear into it. Make it like one of her Instagram posts, but on a grander level. Sort of like how Kendall did the selfies for Vogue a couple of years ago (that weren’t really selfies), I think Kylie acting more at home and in a situation that is not entirely alien to her would seem authentic. Instead this has come off as awkward and false. It’s like they’re trying to glorify a life that Kylie has clearly never led in an attempt to reach consumers who can relate. However, there is nothing more off-putting than one of America’s richest and most famous teens trying to sell you an image of the struggle, the daily hustle. Plus, this does nothing to squash people’s claims of her trying to look black (and profiting off their culture) whilst reaping all the benefits of white privilege. Kylie is not fully to blame for this but she is an active participant.

Overall, I just found the campaign rather unappealing. I feel like it is actually undoing the hard work Rihanna has put in to make the brand one of the cool athletic brands again. It may stand shoulder to shoulder with Nike and Adidas one day (although they are always in a league of their own) and I do think that this campaign will help Puma as a brand, only because everything that the Kardashian/Jenner family touches turns to gold.

Best Looks of 2015

Now that the year has ended and I’m feeling very retrospective I thought it’d be fun to do a round-up of looks worn by the famous folk that I loved this year. I started off by compiling a list off the top of my head and then did some more digging around too. I’ll try not to include looks that I’ve already spoke about on here before for fear of being repetitive but if something is so good I might just have to include it.

What constitutes a good look is tricky. I often feel myself wanting to “up” my looks in daily life and dress a little better. For example, I feel I should accessorise better or wear heels instead of flats but then other times I think what’s the point if nobody’s looking. Also, when you’re getting dressed at 7am the effort levels are low.

Celebrities have more opportunities to dress well and that’s why I love them. Everyday, mundane tasks are rarely photographed (unless its the Kardashians, in which case their grocery shopping will be a headline on the Daily Mail website) so it is usually the bigger red-carpet events or at least occasions that require a little bit of effort. But hey, if they want to go in full on glam and heels just to go shopping then more fool them – at least they have a car service to take them from A to B, no need to worry about hauling their bags on the train!

In no particular order, see my favourite looks of the year:

Beyonce photographed in New York wearing Cushnie et Ochs, DSquared, and Givenchy – May 2015
Nicki Minaj at the VMAs in Labourjoisie – August 2015
Kylie Jenner at the Balmain X H&M launch in the brand – October 2015
Bella Hadid at Chrome Hearts Celebrates Art Basel – December 2015

 

FKA Twigs in Alexander McQueen at the Brit Awards – February 2015
Rihanna in Dior at the Annual Diamond Ball. The wrap is so old Hollywood glam. I love it – December 2015
Lupita Nyong’o in Calvin Klein at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party – February 2015
Julia Roberts in Givenchy at the SAG Awards – January 2015
Beyonce in Proenza Schouler at the Grammys – February 2015
Kate Bosworth in Oscar de la Renta at a “Still Alice” screening – January 2015
Kim Kardashian in Altuzarra, Tom Ford, and others at the Vogue Fashion Fund event – October 2015
Angelina Jolie in Atelier Versace at the Critics Choice Awards – January 2015
Kiernan Shipka in Dior at the Emmys – September 2015
Rihanna in Dior at the brand’s show – October 2015
Selena Gomez in Givenchy at the AMAs – November 2015
Beyonce in Givenchy at the Met Gala (I’m sick of naked dressing but this was insane) – May 2015
Kendall Jenner in Calvin Klein in Cannes – May 2015
Nicki Minaj in Mugler at the BET Awards – June 2015
Zendaya at Ebony Magazine’s Power 100 Gala – December 2015
Chrissy Teigen (an angel) in Solace London at the CFDA Awards – June 2015
Blake Lively in Roksanda promoting Preserve – April 2015

 

An icon in the making, the sweetest kid in America, North West in Balmain for a ballet lesson – May 2015

 

Balmain X H&M is a slight disappointment, and here’s why

I have to admit something, I am disappointed with Balmain x H&M and I never thought I would be. When the collaboration was first announced I was excited and even wrote about it on here, when the initial campaign images came out I thought it would be good, and when the lookbook was shown I planned what I would buy. Everything was going well until I seen the prices and then I was confused.

Now I know you’re probably thinking it’s a designer collaboration so it won’t be regular H&M prices, and that was something that I was fully expecting, don’t get me wrong. However, I didn’t expect the prices to be quite as steep. Reading comments on message boards and online articles, I realised that I wasn’t alone in my surprise. I think we all had one common thought: who is the target market? If you can afford full price Balmain, you won’t compromise the quality and buy it from H&M; if you shop at H&M regularly, you can’t afford $500 for half-fake Balmain. It is confusing.

There are quite a few beautiful, intricately detailed pieces which I can imagine will be the first to sell out, and these are, as you can imagine, the most expensive ones. Incidentally, these also happen to be the pieces worn in the ads and by the Jenners (and any other celebrity who has worn the label). It is disappointing because I knew they’d be pricey but I didn’t expect them to be so pricey. You see, the embellished blazer that Kendall Jenner wore to the announcement costs over $500, as does this stunning velvet and embroidered dress that Kylie Jenner wore to the launch party (which I really wanted to buy as soon as I seen the lookbook). Basically any of the pieces you’ve seen on famous people are $400+ and the rest of the stuff is cheaper. I didn’t have a problem with paying more for these pieces. I actually thought Kylie’s dress would cost around ÂŁ200 ($375-ish), and I thought that price was steep but still reachable, so when I seen the real price I felt slight sticker-shock.

The dress Kylie wore in the runway show

It’s just disappointing because of other designer collaborations as of late which have been better priced. For example, the Lemaire x Uniqlo range was affordable for all budgets, as was the Alexander Wang x H&M range last year. Also, recently Olivier Rousteing was interviewed and he said specifically that he wanted the range to be accessible to all the people who commented on his instagram saying they wished they could afford Balmain – I think he has missed a massive chunk of that market. He also said something about wanting to lower actual Balmain prices too (which makes sense as it’s one of the most ridiculously expensive brands out there).

I don’t mean to complain too much. The range is pretty great with almost identical copies of real Balmain pieces (which no doubt has the original owners riled up), there is some jewellery and t-shirts at the lowest price points, and if you’re someone with a fair income who can’t afford real Balmain but wants a piece of the brand, perhaps you’ll be able to afford one of the pricier items. However, for me, a student, and many others who are in the same boat (love Balmain, could never afford it), it is still out of reach. Oh well. Did I really have a use for a micro-mini dress anyway? Sour grapes.

2015 VMAs Best Dressed

Oh the VMAs. The drama-filled music event which is attended by those who have literally nothing to do with the world of music. Quite a few big pop culture moments have occurred at the annual award show: Britney and Madonna’s kiss; Kanye West interrupting Taylor Swift; Lady Gaga’s meat dress; Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke’s odd performance; and now this year, Nicki Minaj calling out the host herself, the aforementioned Miley Cyrus.

However, I am not here to dwell on the actual show. I want to talk about the stars’ sartorial choices. I’m going to make a list of my picks for the 5 best dressed of the night. See below:

NICKI MINAJ in Labourjoisie

I hope she works with Rushka Bergman for a long time because her looks have been utterly fabulous in the past year or so.

GIGI HADID in Emilia Wickstead

Whilst I think Gigi would’ve looked better had the dress been a little more closed at the front (a high slit still could’ve worked though), the colour looks insane on her.

KYLIE JENNER in Balmain

I’m not a Kylie fan but I cannot deny that she looks so good here. The hairstyle suits her and I love the dress, although I could never wear something so short personally.

SELENA GOMEZ

I didn’t love her first Calvin Klein dress that she wore on the red carpet but she looks amazing in this dress which she changed into for the actual show. She just has a great body and this dress flaunts it.

LILY ALDRIDGE in Alexandre Vaulthier

The plunging neckline couldn’t be any lower but somehow she still looks great. The risquĂ© top is balanced out by the fishtail bottom.

What do you think? Would you have picked somebody else to be on this list?